It's Voluntary

Participation in restorative justice is voluntary and involves a facilitated meeting between the victim and offender.

See how we help

Read below for a few examples of how we helped offenders and victims get closure

Assault

What Happened?

A man assaulted his partner as he was angry over text messages she
had sent.

The Restorative Outcome

The offender apologised profusely for his actions, and his apology was accepted by the victim, who said she did not want him to go to prison. They agreed he needed support to ensure his medication was being taken as prescribed and that they would work together to improve and strengthen their relationship.

Injures with Intent

What Happened?

A man who was the subject of a Protection Order contravened it, by entering his partner’s house and refusing to leave.

The Restorative Outcome

The offender apologised to his partner, saying he was really sorry to have upset her and the children by his behaviour. He admitted that alcohol was a problem for him but that since the offence he had given it up. He also agreed to get counselling and attend a support group.

The victim described to the offender how his behaviour had upset her and their children, who hated to set their parents argue. She said that “the kids miss their Dad” and she hoped that he would not be sent to jail.

The offender and the victim agreed to do a parenting course together.

Burglary

What Happened?

While a family were away on holiday, their home was burgled.

The Restorative Outcome

The offender said his crime was fuelled by his drug habit, and that he had become addicted to drugs after turning to them when his mother died. He was in prison at the time of the RJ Conference, and explained he had now been free from drugs for several months, and was receiving grief counselling.

The victim described how his burglary had affected the family. They had lost items that had huge sentimental value, having been gifted to them by relatives who had since passed away. The children had lost electronic games they had saved for months to buy, and the younger child was scared at night in case the burglar returned.

The offender was visibly upset when he realised the effects of his crime on the victims, and made a commitment to try and lead a crime -free life in future. He also promised to write a letter to the victim in three months’ time, outlining how he was progressing.

Careless Driving Causing Death

What Happened?

A young woman driving to work collided with motorcycle; the rider was killed.

The Restorative Outcome

The son of the deceased attended the RJ Conference with the driver. The driver accepted responsibility for the accident, apologised for her error and acknowledged the pain and suffering she had caused the deceased’s family. The son thanked her for not trying to avoid responsibility, and for her apology He said “it was just an accident and I don’t want this incident to define your life …it could have happened to any of us ….it is not as if you set out to collide with him”.

Possession of an offensive weapon

What Happened?

A young man threated his brother and mother with a machete.

The Restorative Outcome

During the COVID lockdown, the two brothers had argued over the use of a computer. The offender admitted he had lost his temper and he apologised to his parents. He has begun getting counselling for his anger issues and was visibly upset when he heard how much his actions had affected his younger brother.
The parents offered to attend Court with him as support. when he was sentenced.

Careless driving causing death

What Happened?

A woman driver cashed into a motorcyclist, killing him.

The Restorative Outcome

The driver apologised to the mother of the dead man, saying she has little memory of what actually happened. She described how guilty she feels and explained she has since done a defensive driving course and obtained
her full driving licence. The mother accepted her apology and emphasised that, while what happened will never go away, she did not want the driver to suffer forever, and advised her to get counselling.

Assault

What Happened?

A man assaulted a stranger in a pub.

The Restorative Outcome

The offender was supported by his partner at the Conference. He apologised for his actions, admitting that he was drunk and did not know why he had lashed out. The victim accepted the apology, saying he could see the offender was genuinely remorseful. He advised the victim to think of his family in future and to learn from his mistake. The men shook hands
and departed on good terms.

Injures with Intent

What Happened?

A drunk man assaulted a stranger in the street for no reason. He knocked him out and the victim came to in an ambulance on the way to hospital.

The Restorative Outcome

The offender apologised profusely and said he had no idea why he assaulted the victim because he had been drinking heavily for two days. He had begun counselling to address his problem with alcohol, and he offered to pay the medical costs of the victim.

The victim accepted his apology, and encouraged the offender to continue with the counselling. He said he did not want money but would rather the offender used it to help himself and become more settled. He said “The apology has made a huge difference ….it speaks of your worth as a person”.

At the end of the conference the men shook hands and embraced.

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Phone: 06 354 1107 or: 027 2384 564
193 Broadway Ave, Palmerston North

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